Mark Pincus
Founder,
Chief Executive Officer &
Chief Product Officer

Mark is the founder, CEO and chief product officer of Zynga. He founded the company in 2007 with a mission of connecting the world through games, and in founding zynga.org, he also believes that games can do good.

On his way to creating Zynga, Mark started three companies. In 2003, he launched Tribe.net, one of the first social networks. Before that, he founded Support.com, a pioneer in automating tech support, and took it public. In 1995, he launched FreeLoader, the first web-based consumer push company. Mark started his career in new media and venture capital before he discovered his calling as a consumer technology entrepreneur. Mark also made founding investments in Napster, Brightmail, Twitter and Facebook.

Mark graduated summa cum laude from University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business and earned an MBA from Harvard Business School. He is an angel investor in multiple Silicon Valley startups and regularly gives lectures to aspiring entrepreneurs.

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Mark Pincus

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June 08, 2005

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Comments

You are absolutely correct about this one. Back in 1982, I was new to the whole BBS system running on my Apple ][+ with a handset modem. As a 12 year old it was pretty heady stuff communicating with one of the co-founders of Apple computer, scientists from all over the world and some of the first pioneers in the computer industry. It was an environment where the signal was great and the noise was almost non-existent. Many new mediums and forums for communication are like this. The early days of Slashdot, or Orkut and such were havens where you could make meaningful contacts and accomplish more than you otherwise would be able to without those conduits.

As far as anonymity on the Internet, there are ways to remain anonymous, but the effort required is getting greater and greater. It is simply easiest to chose what information you want to be available and engineer the dissemination of that data on the Internet to reflect those desires.

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