Mark Pincus
Founder,
Chief Executive Officer &
Chief Product Officer

Mark is the founder, CEO and chief product officer of Zynga. He founded the company in 2007 with a mission of connecting the world through games, and in founding zynga.org, he also believes that games can do good.

On his way to creating Zynga, Mark started three companies. In 2003, he launched Tribe.net, one of the first social networks. Before that, he founded Support.com, a pioneer in automating tech support, and took it public. In 1995, he launched FreeLoader, the first web-based consumer push company. Mark started his career in new media and venture capital before he discovered his calling as a consumer technology entrepreneur. Mark also made founding investments in Napster, Brightmail, Twitter and Facebook.

Mark graduated summa cum laude from University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business and earned an MBA from Harvard Business School. He is an angel investor in multiple Silicon Valley startups and regularly gives lectures to aspiring entrepreneurs.

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Mark Pincus

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October 25, 2005

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Hi Mark,

This is a great post. In keeping with your thesis, EBay would be wise to study the evolution of stock markets in the United States, particularly the last 20 years. Stock exchanges generate comparatively little money from trading fees/commissions and almost all of their money from ancilliary revenues streams, particularly pricing data. Exchanges that failed to lower transaction costs have seen volume rapidly shift to cheaper alternatives. In the grand scheme of things, most of the money made by firms servicing the stock market is made by services such as margin lending, stock loans, and clearing. Ebay should focus on ancillary services such as payment, escrow, insurance, financing, etc. and try to lower transaction costs to as close to zero as possible. Until they do so, they are in real danger of being usurped in the fashion you describe.

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