Mark Pincus
Founder,
Chief Executive Officer &
Chief Product Officer

Mark is the founder, CEO and chief product officer of Zynga. He founded the company in 2007 with a mission of connecting the world through games, and in founding zynga.org, he also believes that games can do good.

On his way to creating Zynga, Mark started three companies. In 2003, he launched Tribe.net, one of the first social networks. Before that, he founded Support.com, a pioneer in automating tech support, and took it public. In 1995, he launched FreeLoader, the first web-based consumer push company. Mark started his career in new media and venture capital before he discovered his calling as a consumer technology entrepreneur. Mark also made founding investments in Napster, Brightmail, Twitter and Facebook.

Mark graduated summa cum laude from University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business and earned an MBA from Harvard Business School. He is an angel investor in multiple Silicon Valley startups and regularly gives lectures to aspiring entrepreneurs.

Follow Me!

Mark Pincus

« Myspace revenue $200M this year | Main | Anyone noticing huge spam on their blackberry? »

April 23, 2006

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c98a353ef00d8345f706169e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference What's next for social networking?:

» The Next Social Networks Won't Look Like MySpace from Tech Beat
So says Marc Pincus, who knows something about social network from his time at Tribe Networks. Marc wonders if the current online social networks will survive their members, well, growing up and running out of time for mostly checking each... [Read More]

» The Next Social Networks Won't Look Like MySpace from Tech Beat
So says Marc Pincus, who knows something about social networks from his time at Tribe Networks. Marc wonders if the current online social networks will survive their members, well, growing up and running out of time for mostly checking each... [Read More]

Comments

One of the ways that we believe social networks will begin to differentiate their sites, as well as address their monetization issues (see Sunday’s New York Times article), will be an extending their huge memberships and demographic information into “social search”.

Extending the power of these types of huge networks into pure search could be a major factor in the evolution of Search, the differentiating factor for social networks and the primary method used for social networks to achieve their earnings potential. These huge online communities and the smaller sub-communities within them could influence virtually all the key factors in search, including relevance, inclusion and exclusion, advertising paradigms, and the actual content itself. The concept, scaled to its potential and infusing some new technologies might rival or even overtake traditional search technologies as the dominant method for the “Y” generation to find online information. Sure, we'll have to improve the way we search tags and the process of tagging itself. Also, we have to make saving and sharing link information an organic part of a user's browsing experience, and more.

On the advertising/revenue level, it could have serious potential. Extending their paradigm into social search would allow sites to utilize search-spawned sponsored links, a very “tried and true” revenue generating component. Plus, multiple layers of like-minded people inside a community, inside other communities, ad infinitum, could bring targeting advertising to the next evolutionary level, and on a huge scale.

The comments to this entry are closed.